New York Philharmonic: What's New: Latest News and Stories About The New York Philharmonic
Due to scheduled maintenance, online accounts, ticket purchases, and donation pages are currently unavailable. For immediate assistance contact Customer Relations at (212) 875-5656 or customerservice@nyphil.org.

The New York Philharmonic

Update Browser

Pages don't look right?

You are using a browser that does not support the technology used on our website.

Please select a different browser or use your phone or tablet to access our site.

Download: Firefox | Chrome | Safari

If you're using Internet Explorer, please update to the latest version.

Due to scheduled maintenance, online accounts, ticket purchases, and donation pages are currently unavailable. For immediate assistance contact Customer Relations at (212) 875-5656 or customerservice@nyphil.org.

Alan Gilbert and Phil’s Il Prigioniero on N.Y. Times, WQXR Best of 2013

Alan Gilbert conducts  

The New York Times Critic Anthony Tommasini put Alan Gilbert and the Philharmonic’s June 2013 performance of Dallapiccola’s Il Prigioniero on his list of the year’s memorable concerts.

“Alan Gilbert, a champion of the most challenging 20th-century scores,” he wrote,

was at his inspired best for the New York Philharmonic’s concert performance in June of Luigi Dallapiccola’s opera “Il Prigioniero” (“The Prisoner”). First staged in Italy in 1950, this wrenching work is the story of a nameless prisoner during the Spanish Inquisition who is visited by his mother. The audience responded with a five-minute ovation for a 12-tone opera. How often does that happen?

On WQXR’s Operavore, critic Fred Plotkin gave Il Prigioniero two of his “First Annual Excellence in Opera Awards (AKA The Freddies),” for Sustained Excellence in Performance and Operas New to Me.

Alan Gilbert Gives 'Glistening Clarity' to Britten

Alan Gilbert 

About the all-Britten program Music Director Alan Gilbert conducted Nov. 21–23, The New Yorker's Alex Ross wrote, "Alan Gilbert, on the podium, gave glistening clarity to the insectoid instrumental writing" in Spring Symphony.

In The New York Times, Anthony Tommasini wrote, describing the same work: "Mr. Gilbert drew out the modernist strands of this score. The performance from the inspired orchestra, the New York Choral Artists and the impressive Brooklyn Youth Chorus was a highlight of the Britten year."

'Vibrant, Lucid and Intriguing'

Alan Gilbert 

"As music director of the New York Philharmonic, the conductor Alan Gilbert has probably drawn the highest praise for his compelling advocacy of new, recent and overlooked repertory. But he is now making a significant artistic statement by leading a performance of a towering repertory work, Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony," The New York Times' Anthony Tommasini wrote.

Here's Tommasini's review of that statement:

"For the New York Philharmonic’s concert at Avery Fisher Hall on Thursday night, the conductor Alan Gilbert took the idea of pairing a new work with a Beethoven symphony, which has become fairly common, to another dimension. The main work was Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Mr. Gilbert’s first performance of that piece with the Philharmonic. He led a vibrant, lucid and intriguing account that culminated with a fleet, exciting finale. ...

True to form, this insightful musician reveals the inner workings and wondrous complexities of the piece. In the first movement, I have seldom heard the bursts of counterpoint played with such transparency and rhythmic point. ...

His tempo for the scherzo was reined in just enough to make the jarring rhythmic accents leap out and the matrix of interwoven lines come through. The slow movement, which unfolded at a lapping Adagio pace, had lyrical elegance and rich string sound."

The Beethoven followed the U.S. Premiere of Frieze, by the British composer Mark-Anthony Turnage. “Frieze is an audacious and vividly orchestrated piece from a major composer," Tommasini wrote. "Mr. Gilbert drew a kaleidoscopic performance from the Philharmonic."

 

PHOTOS: Final 2013 Concerts in Vail

The Philharmonic wrapped up its 11th-annual summer residency at Bravo! Vail with three concerts that took audiences from Broadway to outer space, from Finland to the Lincoln Tunnel. Check out highlights from the Orchestra's final days performing in stunning Vail, Colorado, with conductors Bramwell Tovey and Ted Sperling, and Principal Trombone Joseph Alessi, violinist Gil Shaham, and singers Betsy Wolfe and Andrew Samonsky as soloists.

Photos by Chris Lee.

PHOTOS: The Return to Vail

The Philharmonic has traded New York for cooler climes: the Bravo! Vail festival in the heart of Colorado's Rocky Mountains. The Orchestra has already performed three concerts there, and made time for workshops with Very Young Composers of Vail. Check out photos from the residency thus far.

Photos by Zach Mahone Photography.

PHOTOS: Philharmonic Al Fresco

More than 144,000 New Yorkers and visitors gathered in NYC's five boroughs to hear the Philharmonic during the ever-popular Concerts in the Parks, Presented by Didi and Oscar Schafer.

Audiences were rapt for Principal Cello Carter Brey's stirring performances of Dvořák’s Cello Concerto, Alan Gilbert and the Orchestra delivered powerful accounts of Tchaikovsky's Fifth Symphony, and beautiful sunsets and Bay Fireworks accompanied the New York skyline.

Re-live highlights from the Concerts in the Parks through the Virtual Tour.

Alan's "Legacy of Change"

Alan Gilbert and the New York Philharmonic

With the last of our Concerts in the Parks last night, we have brought our 2012–13 New York season to a close, and the critics have looked back, not only on this year, but on the first four with Alan Gilbert as Music Director. On Tuesday The New York Times raved about his commitment to a vibrant range of activities, from the Parks Concerts and educational activities to new-music initiatives such as CONTACT! and next season’s inaugural NY PHIL BIENNIAL, and concluded, “he is building a legacy that matters and is helping to change the template for what an American orchestra can be.”

This, on the heels of New York Magazine’s June 30 assessment, titled “The Invisible Revolution,” which declared that “Alan Gilbert’s unflashy radicalism is re-creating the Philharmonic,” and noted highlights such as his “powerful case for wresting [Bach’s B-minor Mass] back from specialists and performing it with an anachronistic but rich and supple ensemble” and the “searing violence” of his interpretation of Dallapiccola’s Il prigioniero, in which “there was not a perfunctory second.” After musing on how the Music Director “travels through a musical landscape with a naturalist’s vigilance, alert to moments of drama even before they happen, knowing that a distant, barely audible murmur portends a calamitous event nearby,” the critic concluded, “It’s a good thing he’s game for adventures.”

We couldn’t agree more!

PHOTOS: Casey and Carey at the Bat

On Saturday, the Philharmonic and Music Director Alan Gilbert headed to Central Park to share the stage with pop sensation Mariah Carey and baseball legend Joe Torre for the MLB All-Star Charity Concert benefiting Hurricane Sandy relief.

Go to top