What Does <em>Boléro</em> Look Like? | What's New: Latest News and Stories About The New York Philharmonic
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Due to scheduled maintenance, online accounts, ticket purchases, and donation pages are currently unavailable. For immediate assistance contact Customer Relations at (212) 875-5656 or customerservice@nyphil.org.

What Does Boléro Look Like?

Posted August 27, 2013

unravelling bolero

This, according to the late Canadian artist Anne Adams. In 1994, Adams completed “Unravelling Boléro,” a bar-by-bar depiction of Ravel's slinky, Spain-tinged piece. Rich color spectrum: check. One long, slow crescendo: check. Those pinks and oranges (over what looks like New York at night) toward the end are the key change, of course.

Adams had progressive aphasia, which can cause a flowering of activity in a brain area that integrates different senses. The kicker: Ravel had it, too, according to one scientific study. Another symptom is a compulsion toward repetition — could Boléro be an example?

Read the fascinating story and hear Boléro September 25 at the Opening Gala or the Free Dress Rehearsal.